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22
Apr

by Seth Lightcap. posted on 22 April

Between the rush of our daily lives and the drive to explore wild summits and shred fresh tracks, it is often all too easy to take for granted the amazing yet fragile natural world we we live in. EARTH day, April 22nd, is the perfect opportunity to slow down and reflect on the importance of the environment in our lives. In celebration of Earth Day, we’d like to bring awareness to the environment by sharing our Green Mission statement and presenting some background on the environmental organizations we support with your support of our company. We strive to lead by example so we hope you will join us in our efforts this Earth Day and take the time to do your part toward protecting our magnificent natural playground.

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Green Mission

Jones Snowboards is committed to being an outdoor industry leader in the fight against climate change. Building snowboards will always have an environmental footprint so we strive to minimize this footprint whenever possible by developing new eco-tech and supporting organizations that fight against climate change on the front lines. We take these efforts seriously because we care about how our actions will affect the environment for future generations.

Green Partners
Our quest to improve the sustainability of our products is only one facet of our environmental efforts. We strive to take real action against climate change through our partnerships with the non-profit organizations 1% For The Planet and Protect Our Winters (POW).

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1% For The Planet

Jones Snowboards is a proud member of 1% For The Planet. 1% For The Planet
is a growing association of businesses that have pledged to give 1% of their sales directly to sustainability-oriented non-profits. The mission of 1% FTP is to leverage this alliance of financially committed businesses to support
a healthy planet.

"We understand that supporting environmental efforts is important to our customers,” said Jeremy Jones. “As a member of 1% For The Planet our customers are assured that their support goes beyond just our profits. We are proudly accountable for giving back to the earth."

1% For The Planet member companies support thousands of non-profit organizations helping to save land, protect forests, rivers and oceans, make agricultural and energy production more sustainable, get toxics out of the environment, plastics out of the oceans and more. 1% for the Planet carefully vets each nonprofit for track record, credibility and impact and annually verifies that members are making their contributions. More than $100 million dollars has been invested by 1% for the Planet members in the last ten years. Jones is one of very few 1% For The Planet member companies in the snowboard industry. We are honored to make this donation because it shows our steadfast belief that business can lead the fight for positive environmental change.

If you own a business you can join 1% For The Planet. Learn how to join the movement here: www.onepercentfortheplanet.org

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Protect Our Winters

Jones Snowboards donates 100% of our 1% For The Planet funds to the climate change action organization Protect Our Winters (POW). Protect Our Winters (POW) is a climate change organization founded by Jeremy Jones in 2007. The mission of POW is to engage and mobilize the winter sports community to lead the fight against climate change. POW is the environmental center point of this global community and unites brands, athletes and communities towards a common goal of reducing climate change’s effects on our sports and local economies. The collective power of the winter sports community is massive and POW helps organize the effort to step up and take responsibility to save a season that fuels our passions and provides jobs and economic vitality to mountain regions.
Jones’ 1% For The Planet donation to POW is used to support their efforts to push climate change legislation in Washington D.C., fight coal exports in the Pacific Northwest, as well as promote climate change awareness campaigns such as the ’Hot Athlete Cool Planet’ program that brings professional athletes into schools to talk about climate change. A portion of the donation to POW is also used to directly offset global warming-causing greenhouse gases by supporting rainforest reforestation efforts in Costa Rica through the non-profit organization Community Carbon Trees.

Individuals and businesses can join Protect Our Winters. Learn more about POW here: protectourwinters.org

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Community Carbon Trees

In May 2014, Jeremy Jones and his family traveled to Costa Rica and volunteered for the non-profit rainforest reforestation association Community Carbon Trees (CCT). CCT has spent the last twelve years fighting against climate change by reforesting clear cut swaths of Costa Rican rainforest with a wide diversity of native tropical trees. Planting and protecting trees is truly one of the most important steps toward fighting global warming as forests pull carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and recycle it into oxygen. The benefits of reforestation in Costa Rica are greater than most other places on Earth because trees are able to grow 365 days-a-year thanks to Costa Rica’s unique location within 10 degrees of the Equator. Fast growing trees offset enormous amounts of carbon dioxide, much more than trees planted in non-tropical areas.

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Rainforest reforestation happens one tree at a time. Jeremy and his family got involved with the effort collecting seeds, planting saplings and preparing ground while volunteering with Community Carbon Trees in Costa Rica.

Founded by lawyer turned rainforest activist Jennifer Leigh Smith, CCT is a group of full-time local workers and volunteers that have successfully reforested dozens of clear cut swaths by planting and maintaining over 4000 new trees. Jeremy and his family helped Jennifer and the CCT crew collect tree seeds, plant saplings and prepare land for future reforestation. Witnessing CCT’s efforts and connection with the community was a game changer for Jeremy.
"I’ve searched for years for a rainforest program to support," said Jeremy Jones. "I found it with CCT. Jennifer takes real action for the environment and the local people love her. She brings them work and reforests their land in a way that they can make a living off maintaining the forests."
CCT managed reforestation projects are on a 25-year cycle. CCT work crews maintain the trees for the first three years and the participating landowner takes over the continued maintenance and receives instruction for an additional 22 years. Unlike many other mono-culture reforestation efforts that only plant one tree variety, CCT plants dozens. Some of the trees planted will bear fruit and some will grow into valuable hardwood that is acceptable to be harvested in 25 years. The estimated cost per tree for the 25-year cycle is $25. With our 2015 donation to CCT, Jones Snowboards will help reforest an important biological corridor with nearly 400 trees.

Learn more about the climate benefits of rainforest reforestation and donation and volunteer opportunities with CCT here: www.communitycarbontrees-costarica.com

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10
Apr

by Seth Lightcap. posted on 10 April

March roared in like a lion! Storms pummeled the Alps, Tetons and Sierra the first week of March and got a lot of shredders hopes up for a big month of serious dumpage. As it turned out, ’Miracle March’ did not live up to expectations, but it did snow a little bit, a lot of places. Here’s some shots from where our team and ambassadors found the fluff in March:

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Forrest Shearer (@forrestshearer) traveled to the country of Kosovo to film with Teton Gravity Research (@tetongravity). Photo - (@superhamdo)

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Alpine playground in Kosovo. Photo - Forrest Shearer

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Luca Pandolfi (@pandolf73) went couloir hunting in the Italian Dolomites.

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Luca charges into the Dolomiti mist. Photo - (@rickybrussa)

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Splitboard guide Neil Mcnab (@neilmcnab)led a ’Backcountry Steeps’ course in France and Italy. Here’s his crew enroute to a line.

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Chris Yapp cashes in on Mcnab’s masterful powder hunting skills.

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Claudia Avon (@claudia_avon) took a road trip to Southern Colorado. She hiked and ripped this line in Silverton. Photo - Ben Eng (@bitchin_camaro)

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Claudia flashed the steep line on the left in Telluride.

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Allison Lightcap (@allisonlightcap) barreled into some face melting blower in Grand Teton National Park. Photo - Seth Lightcap (@sethlightcap).

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Jimmy Goodman (@goddmannnnnn) found this glory panel in the High Sierra. Photo - Seth Lightcap (@sethlightcap).


Mariah Dugan (@gnar__marr) threaded this cool line in the Mammoth backcountry. Photo - (@davefaus)

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Jumping back across the Atlantic...check out this epic sunset Sten Smola (@sten_smola) caught on a splitboard mission in the Swiss Valais.

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Another stunning scenic shot from Sten’s home turf in the Swiss Valais.

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Miikka Hast (@miikkaphoto) chased pow to Northern Norway in March. Here he’s on the hunt in the Lyngen Alps.

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An incredible northern lights show danced across the sky one night Miikka was camping in Senja.

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We’ll leave off with a teaser to the April team powder report...it’s AK season! Chris Coulter (@chris_coulter) snapped this insane spine wall shot in Haines, AK.

7
Apr

by Seth Lightcap. posted on 7 April

Stoked to share a trip report from American Avalanche Institute Instructor and Bozeman splitboard guide Clark Corey. Clark is one of the most prolific splitboarders in the Northern Rockies and has explored all over Idaho and Montana on a Jones Solution. Here’s a report from an adventurous line he found last season in the Spanish Peaks of Montana:

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South face of Beehive Peak

Story and Photos by Clark Corey

Some lines draw your attention because they are plum, clean, obvious and meant to be. Others perk your interest because of the mystery, because they do not go clean and you wonder how it would go down and in some cases how you would get off. These are fun because it involves creativity, a sense of adventure, and sometimes a sense of humor. The South face of Beehive Peak in Montana would be one of those lines.

Last season, long time ski-partner Drew Pogge and myself got to explore one line which we’d wondered about for several years on Beehive. The South face is really just a hanging ribbon of snow which skirts a 600 foot sheer rock face before abruptly ending in outer space. Not a whole lot of room for riding, but plenty of room for imagination and “what if’s?”. On some years the line isn’t filled in at all, and other years only for a short period of time.

On numerous occasions while riding various lines off and around Beehive we’d looked up and wondered; always trying to imagine how it would feel and where you would exit. Then one day I was talking with ski legend Tom Youngst about Beehive (who had pioneered other lines on the peak) and he mentioned the line. He too, had wondered about it, and always “imagined what it would be like”, but had never gotten around to it in his hay day. Although he didn’t have an intentions of skiing it now, he was clearly still excited about it and his enthusiasm was infectious. Drew and I started calling it “Tom’s face”. If nothing else, we had to ride it now so that we could tell Tom what it was like!

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The climb up the backside is a fun adventure in and of itself. The route weaves around various snow plastered rockbands, past gendarmes and than ends in a short 5th class move and airy ridge to the summit.

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We made calculated turns riding the upper snowfield. Snow was sun softened, smooth and creamy. Photo (above/below) by Drew Pogge.

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We anticipated that finding the anchor would be the trickiest part, as the rest was pretty straight forward: climb the peak, drop into the snowfield that dead ends in a huge cliff. After all, it was fairly committing as you had to ride down right to the very bottom of the snowfield, and there were some unknowns about the anchor. However, we knew the rock on Beehive peak’s south face is good quality, with lots of featured cracks and blocks so we knew there had to be something solid. Via recon pictures and on the approach, we had identified a nice spot to pull up and assess how to get off, and when Drew skied up he quickly saw a perfect rock horn. One sling and 100 feet of rappelling later we were safety standing in the top of the Forth of July couloir. For once in life, things couldn’t have worked out any better.

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After we were down in the basin we did laugh looking back up because there wasn’t a ton of riding off the top, and it almost seemed silly for all the effort and to risk falling off the south face just for a short amount of turns. However, this wasn’t about attaining maximum vertical for the effort, or picking the line with the best fall line riding. It was more about the overall adventure – summiting a cool peak, making turns in a wild place, piecing it all together and figuring it all out.

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