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Jones Avalanche Awareness Month

Mountain Safety / Seth Lightcap
3
Dec

This December marks Jones Snowboard’s fifth annual Avalanche Awareness Month. We feel December is the ideal month to refresh your understanding of Avalanche and Emergency First Aid skills so you are prepared and well-practiced to make good decisions for the rest of the winter.

This video from the Utah Avalanche Center gives a good overview of the importance of educating yourself about avalanche danger. Let the video be motivation to take the next step and expand or refresh your avy skills by taking a professional course. Online articles and videos about avalanche education topics provide valuable supplemental knowledge but there is no substitution for taking a class. To understand how to safely study and observe the snowpack you need to spend a few days in the field with the experts.

There are more avalanche courses offered in North America this winter than ever before. If you have been interested in taking a course but never have, or have taken the Level One and have wanted to take Level Two, now is the time to schedule it on your winter calendar.

As the Utah Avy Center stresses, knowledge is power when it comes to making safe choices in the backcountry and an avy course is the best place to build this educational foundation. Once you know the facts, your experience in the field will be that much more rewarding and informative because you will know what you see in the snowpack as you tour.

A comprehensive list of most avy courses offered in the US can be found here:

http://aiare.info/course_list.php

For classes in Canada check here:

http://old.avalanche.ca/cac/training/ast/courses

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Author
Seth Lightcap
Category
Mountain Safety
Published on
3 December 2014

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